Antique Printmaking Methods

Antique Printmaking Methods

Antique Printmaking Methods Engraving Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, usually flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. The result in an intaglio printing plate, of copper or another metal, for printing images on paper as prints or illustrations; these images are also called engravings. Read More... Wood engravings were used for newspapers – such as “Harpers Weekly” Engraving was a historically important method of producing images on paper in artistic printmaking, in mapmaking, and also for commercial reproductions and illustrations for books and magazines. Intaglio is the family of printing and printmaking techniques in which the image is incised into a surface, and the incised line or sunken area holds the ink. It is the direct opposite of a relief print. Etching An etching is created by covering a metal plate with an acid-resistant layer of wax called a ground and drawing a design through the ground using an etching needle. The plate is then placed in an acid bath for 3-15 minutes, which bites into the exposed lines, thus etching the design into the plate. Read More... After dipping the plate in acid, sections of the design can be stopped out with varnish and the plate immersed in the acid again. This creates a deeper bite, and thus darker lines, for those areas not stopped out. Etching is an intaglio process, so prints made in this manner will have a platemark. Etching allows for a freer artistic hand than does engraving. Woodblock Woodblocks entail creating a relief image like a stamp on a block of wood by cutting away the parts that...
About the Print Makers

About the Print Makers

About the Print Makers Bodmer, Karl A native of Zurich, Bodmer is best known in the U.S. as the painter who captured the American West of the 19th century with incredibly accurate depictions of its inhabitants. The German explorer Prince Maximilian zu Wied-Neuwied hired Bodmer from 1832-1834 for his Missouri River expedition. He was hired as the artist of the expedition to record images of cities, rivers, towns and people they saw along the way, including many images of Native Americans. In 1877 Bodmer was made a Knight in the French Legion of Honour for his incredible artistic contributions. Curtis, Samuel William Curtis was a noted botanist who began The Botanical Magazine in 1787, this periodical sold two thousand copies of each print during William’s lifetime. After his death in 1799, his son Thomas Curtis took over the Magazine. However, it was his nephew, a biographer and horticulturalist, Samuel Curtis who really established the magazine and changed the name to Curtis’s Botanical Magazine. It is the longest running botanical publication in history, and it continues to be published by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew as a publication for those interested in horticulture, ecology, or botanical illustration.   de Bry, Theodor A Protestant family of engravers who owned and operated their own printing house, the head of the family was Theodor de Bry, who taught his son Johann Theodor de Bry his craft. Father and son shared a fascination with the discovery of the Americas and thusly their engravings primarily focused on the journey there, and on the peoples, the floral, and the fauna of North and South America. Since...

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